The Conundrum of the Unhallowed

The pastoral and the demonic...

The pastoral and the demonic…

(on the way to church from Sunday morning milk pickup at the lately-pumpkin-and-ghost-bedecked local farm)

David:  Why is there no church day in Halloween?

Me:  Er, what do you mean?

David:  Why does Halloween not have a church day?

Me:  Oh: do you mean, why do we not go to church during the Halloween season?

David:  Yes.

Me:  Well… Christmas is a day, but it’s also a season. Halloween isn’t really a season in the same way… though the decorations do come out a while before the day itself, I guess.  Hallow-e’en means “All Hallows Eve.”  All Hallows’ Day, or All Saints’ Day, is November first. (Hallowed means “holy,” which is we call them “holy-days,” or holidays. Holy mean “set apart” or special.)  So: All Saints’ Day, or All Hallows Day, is the day when we celebrate all God’s holy Saints. And All Hallows Eve is the holiday—or I should say the day; or night, rather—before All Saints’ Day.

David:  But if it’s a holiday, why do people put up scary decorations?

Me:  Wellll… Grm.  All Saints’ Day is a holiday, but I don’t know that Halloween is a holiday.

(sigh)

You know, David: I guess some people who do not like God, and who like Satan instead, use Halloween to celebrate bad things instead of good things. Some good people use Halloween to celebrate pumpkins and fall and good things, but other people use Halloween to celebrate bad things.  It’s not really the best thing to do, but that’s how it is.

David:  But— but the farmer is a good person; so why does she have scary decorations?

Me:  Come back soon, Lord Jesus.  Come back soon.

Advertisements

Advent of Paradox

Advent: Week 1

Advent: Week 1

Me (finishing the day’s Advent reading from The Jesse Tree):  “… before time, He had another plan.  A plan not to destroy the world, but to rescue it, by sending His Own Son to save it.”

David:  Who is God’s son?

I have just played the part of Gabriel in our church’s live nativity, delivering to the first human ears the Name Above All Names, and perhaps the first Trinitarian statement of the New Testament: “The HOLY SPIRIT shall come upon you, and the power of the MOST HIGH shall overshadow you: therefore the Holy One you are to bear shall be the SON OF GOD.”

Me (smiling):  JESUS is God’s Son.

David (quizzical look):  But…

Me (smiling some more): Jesus is God; and Jesus is also God’s Son.

David (fully cognizant of the former proposition, and properly trained in the latter, but only now seeing them juxtaposed): But how can there be two Jesuses?

Me:  There are not two Jesuses.  God the Father is God; and Jesus His Son is also God.  There is only one God; but there are three Persons: God the Father, Jesus the Son, and the Holy Spirit.  It is called Trinity, three in one.  It is hard to understand.

David (still hung up on the mathematical difficulty):  Three in one?

Me:  Yes.

David:  But… who is the Holy Spirit?

Assembling Tradition

Assembling Tradition (directions)